Math Problem

Some math is easy,
super, super easy.
It gets done in ten minutes or less.

But today, math is not at its best,
with this question confusing,
and not too amusing.

Like why tic raised to tac over tic raised to toe,
equals different things to the people I know.

Does it make this, tic raised to tac-toe?
Or even this, tic raised to t(ac-oe)?
I think it might be this,
tic raised to ac-oe, but I don't know.

One math book says yes but the other says no,
I wish math was easier today though.

What do you think? What do you tic raised to tac over tic raised to toe (tic^tac/tic^toe) equals? Put it in the comments if you think you know.

Tensegrity Structure

Today I made a Tensegrity Structure. This figure is also known as a anti-gravity suspension structure, however the structure needs gravity to work. The top of the structure is pulled down by gravity, however the middle string is resisting gravity. The other strings are keeping the top of the structure from collapsing. If you flip the stucture over the top will still ‘float’. Soon I would like to make another one (or two or three) but balance it a bit better so I can put things on it.

The English Dictionary Of Common Words Redefined (EDOCWR). The B’s.

Band·age (băn′dĭj), Noun.

The particular period of time which was dominated by band players. Suzu lived in the bandage.

Bat·tle-door (băt′l-dôr), Noun.

A door used for battle, often as a barricade, shield, or weapon. The king’s army had hundreds of battle-doors.

Bob·bin (bŏb′ĭn), Noun.

A box or crate filled with knots of worms on a string, most often used by eel fishers. Franklin had a bobbin.

Bram·ble-net (brăm′bəl-nēt), Noun or Verb.

1: Noun. A net fashioned to catch or gather thorns or brambles. Rufus had a bramble-net.

2: Verb. To throw a net over a cluster of thorns or brambles. Rufus liked to bramble-net.

If you have any suggestions please write them in the comments.

The English Dictionary Of Common Words Redefined.

While going through a dictionary I noticed that many words could be redefined. Here is part one of the dictionary, the A’s

Air-con·di·tion (âr`kэndish`эn), verb.
A particular state of being for air, or to limit or restrict air.
The air-condition was cold today

An·ti·air·craft (an`tē âr`kraft`), noun.
A vehicle that does not fly, float, or move in air without touching the
ground or water. Examples; cars, boats, or submarines, ect.
I rode in a anti-aircraft to the park.

Arm·chair (ärm`chэr), noun.
A chair having or bearing weapons, esp firearms, but not restricting any kind of weapons.
In Chairland there is a group of evil armchairs

Art·less (ärt`lis), adj.
To be without anything in the realm of things that have beauty and form.
The king of the Goblins was artless

If you would like to make some suggestions, please put them in the comments. Thank you.

To Run Away (From Crocodiles and Alligatas)

Listen now and I shall tell ya
how to run away from crocodiles and alligatas.
If you live where there are flurries
you have no reason to worry.

But if you live where it is hot
and you spy a dreaded croc
who chases you and his lips he licks,
you take a big long stick
find it's nose or eye to hit.

Now to run away in time
away from the alligatas and crocidi.
But do not run in a straight line,
if it is a great huge alliagati.
Yet do run straight with lots of speed
if you meet a crocode.

I warn you now to be safe,
around the crocodiles and alligatas.

Or you could hide
in a tree so tall and high
if you do not want to die,
around the dangerous crocodie.

Do not swim in water deep,
with bare feet,
away from crocodiles and alligatas.
So now you know about these beasts,
with sharp, sharp, teeth.

Now please be aware of how to run away from
crocodiles and alligatas!

Her Prince Never Came

“Her Prince Never Came” by Adrian McGuire, February 2020. Gel pen and pencil

For school Mom made us write a paragraph about dragons. Then she told us to draw a picture representing our ideas about dragons. Most of my paragraph was about how they were dangerous most of all to goats, sheep, and princess. So I drew a picture about how they were dangerous to the princess. (It also shows their ways of cooking).

Ice Dragon Eggs

Yesterday Mom was freezing balloons full of water to make ice candles so I decided to try a experiment. I took two water balloons and filled one up with hot water and the other with cold water and then put them in the freezer overnight. I had hoped that one ball would be clearer then the other. The experiment did not work how I wanted to though. When I removed the balloons from around the ice they looked very much alike. They were also frozen through so Mom could not put candles in them, then I had a idea.

I recently had a science experiment where I put salt on ice and the salt melted part of the ice. So I put some food coloring on top of the ice balls and then added salt. They were easy to make and looked like a ice dragon’s eggs. If you want to make some you will need:

  • Balloons, any type (I used water balloon size)
  • Water
  • Scissors
  • Food coloring, liquid or solid (“icing colors”), any colors
  • A plastic knife if using solid food coloring
  • Salt
  1. Fill up balloons with water until desired size.
  2. Place in the freezer or outside (when weather is below freezing) overnight or longer until frozen through.
  3. Over a sink cut the balloons and peel the balloon pieces off the ice.
  4. If using liquid food coloring carefully drip desired colors around the top of the ice egg. (I think this will work)
  5. If using solid food coloring spread desired colors around the top of the ice egg with a plastic knife.
  6. Sprinkle salt on top of the ice egg.
  7. Let sit for a few minutes then put outside if cold enough or in the freezer on a pan and enjoy them.

Sledding fun

Brotherly love

A while ago we went sledding with Mark. After he went back to school we went sledding again. Both times were a lot of fun!

We also took our small snowboard and played with that a little